Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is a Washington, D.C. law firm providing chemical and chemical product stakeholders unparalleled experience, judgment, and excellence in matters relating to TSCA, and other global chemical management programs.

Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is pleased to offer the recording, slides, and written Question and Answer (Q&A) document from our “PFAS Reporting Rules -- What Every Company Needs to Know” webinar, focusing on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed reporting rules for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), presented by B&C Managing Partner Lynn L. Bergeson and Director of Chemistry Richard E. Engler, Ph.D.
 
Do you wonder if the PFAS reporting rules extend to domestically-produced articles? Or if businesses that incorporate PFAS into their products are required to notify the end users? Do you know whether you need to report your Low Volume Exemption (LVE) substance? We encourage you to view the webinar and read the additional materials to learn answers to these and other questions related to EPA’s recent PFAS actions.
 
We also encourage you to consider the following issues discussed in the webinar and to submit comments to EPA regarding how these will affect your operations:

  • Identifying chemicals subject to reporting (i.e., specific PFAS and whether to include imported articles);
  • Considerations for economic analysis;
  • Submission period;
  • Potential duplicative reporting concerns;
  • Scope of “existing environmental and health information” collected;
  • Additional data elements or information collected;
  • EPA’s use and publication of non-confidential business information (CBI);
  • Availability of joint submissions; and
  • Small manufacturer considerations (i.e., regulatory and non-regulatory assistance and outreach).

Comments on EPA’s proposed PFAS rules are due on September 27, 2021.
 
The recording and slides are available online. E-mail .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to request written answers to selected questions from the Q&A session of the webinar.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold a webinar on September 24, 2021, for stakeholders to learn how to access and use the pollution prevention (P2) information collected by the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program about projects implemented by companies to eliminate or reduce the creation of chemical waste. According to EPA, community members, local government representatives, facility personnel, and others can access this information through multiple online resources and use it to further the identification and advancement of P2 opportunities. The webinar will include a live demonstration of how to find P2 data for specific facilities, chemicals, and industry sectors, as well as:

  • Details on what data facilities are required to report;
  • Examples of P2 projects implemented at manufacturing facilities; and
  • Resources for and benefits of implementing P2 projects at facilities.

The webinar is also part of a series of webinars to mark the 35th anniversary of the TRI Program. Registration is now open.


 

This week's All Things Chemical® Podcast will be of interest to readers of the TSCAblog®. A brief description of the episode written by Lynn L. Bergeson is below.
 
This week I sat down with Richard E. Engler, Ph..D., Director of Chemistry with Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) and The Acta Group (Acta®), to discuss the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) continuing struggle to regulate certain persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals, especially those found in finished products, what EPA refers to as “articles.” The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) has always applied to the products, or articles, that contain chemical substances of interest to EPA under TSCA. While EPA previously used that authority somewhat sparingly, the 2016 Amendments to TSCA have jump-started a new wave of regulations that expressly apply to articles. EPA is required under TSCA to regulate certain PBTs, and EPA issued a final rule earlier this year that inspired chaos in the business community, especially in the electronics sector and its complicated supply chain. Rich and I discuss these PBT rules and help explain what may well be the new normal with regard to the regulation of finished products under TSCA.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
On September 17, 2021, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final rule amending the regulations applicable to phenol, isopropylated phosphate (3:1) (PIP (3:1)) promulgated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). 86 Fed. Reg. 51823. Specifically, EPA is extending the compliance date applicable to the processing and distribution in commerce of certain PIP (3:1)-containing articles, and the PIP (3:1) used to make those articles, from March 8, 2021, to March 8, 2022. For such articles, EPA states that it is also extending the compliance date for the recordkeeping requirements applicable to manufacturers, processors, and distributors from March 8, 2021, to March 8, 2022. According to EPA, the articles covered by the amendment “include a wide range of key consumer and commercial goods such as cellular telephones, laptop computers, and other electronic and electrical devices and industrial and commercial equipment used in various sectors including transportation, life sciences, and semiconductor production.” The final rule is effective September 17, 2021. More information on the final PIP (3:1) rule and on EPA’s plan for a new rulemaking on persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals is available in our September 3, 2021, memorandum, “EPA Plans New Rulemaking for PBTs, Extends Compliance Dates for PIP (3:1) Rule.”


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) held a virtual public meeting on September 15, 2021, on its forthcoming regulations to implement the Toxic Chemicals in Children’s Products Law. New York’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL) Article 37 Title 9 establishes an ingredient disclosure program and prohibits certain chemicals in children’s products. ECL Article 37 instructs NYS DEC to promulgate lists of chemicals of concern and high priority chemicals that must be disclosed if present in children's products by March 1, 2022. ECL Article 37 also prohibits the sale of children’s products containing benzene, asbestos, or tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate effective January 1, 2023. NYS DEC has posted a list of chemicals under consideration and their practical quantification limits. The list includes the evidence that NYS DEC has identified to justify listing the chemicals. Comments may be submitted via e-mail to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or via mail to:

Emily Dominiak
NYS DEC -- Division of Materials Management
625 Broadway
Albany, NY 12233-7252
Comments must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. (EDT) on October 15, 2021.

According to NYS DEC’s website, NYS DEC has made a recording of the September 15, 2021, meeting available for review. The website notes that NYS DEC “will hold a formal public comment period on the proposed rule at a later date, which will be published in the Environmental Notice Bulletin.”


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
On August 31, 2021, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the final scope documents for the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) risk evaluations of diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP) and diisononyl phthalate (DINP). 86 Fed. Reg. 48695; 86 Fed. Reg. 48693. In its August 31, 2021, press release, EPA notes that both DIDP and DINP “belong to a family of chemicals called phthalates and are commonly used as plasticizers in the production of plastic and plastic coating to increase flexibility.”
 
According to EPA, the final scope documents reflect the policy changes on risk evaluations announced in June 2021. This includes plans to consider exposure pathways that may be regulated outside of TSCA, like air and water, and potential for exposures to fenceline communities (i.e., communities near industrial facilities). EPA states that “[a]ssumptions that personal protective equipment (PPE) in occupational settings will always be properly utilized will not be used as the basis for the risk determination. Use of PPE, and other ways industry protects its workers, will be assessed during the risk evaluation and considered as potential ways to address unreasonable risks during the risk management process.” More information on the policy changes is available in our July 1, 2021, memorandum.
 
The final scope documents explain EPA’s plan for the risk evaluations, including the conditions of use, hazards, exposures, and the potentially exposed or susceptible subpopulations that EPA will consider. The documents also include a description of the reasonably available information and the best available science approaches that EPA will use; a conceptual model that outlines the potential hazards and exposures throughout the life cycle of the chemical; an analysis plan to identify the approaches and methods EPA will use to assess health and environmental risks; and a plan for peer review. More information will be available in a forthcoming memorandum that will be posted on our website.


 

WEBINAR
Thursday, September 9, 2021
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (EDT)
Register Now

Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is pleased to present a complimentary webinar focused on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) regulations on September 9, 2021, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (EDT). B&C Managing Partner Lynn L. Bergeson and Director of Chemistry Richard E. Engler, Ph.D., will discuss three actions recently taken by EPA:

  • Proposing a rule designed to obtain comprehensive data on more than 1,000 PFAS manufactured in the United States;
  • Withdrawing guidance that EPA believes weakened its July 2020 significant new use rule (SNUR) restricting certain long-chain PFAS; and
  • Publishing a final rule that incorporates three additional PFAS into the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) maintained under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA).

The proposed rule intended to obtain comprehensive data on PFAS would require all manufacturers (including importers) of PFAS in any year since 2011 to report information related to chemical identity, categories of use, volumes manufactured and processed, byproducts, environmental and health effects, worker exposure, and disposal.
 
As a result of these EPA regulatory actions, companies that never expected to need to know the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) are now finding themselves in EPA’s crosshairs. This webinar will explore the full scope of these potential rules, how entities can determine if they will be subject to reporting, and the specific recordkeeping requirements that have been proposed.

Register for the webinar now
 


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) will hold a virtual public meeting on September 15, 2021, on the toxic chemicals in children’s products law. NYSDEC will present the chemicals under consideration for listing as Chemicals of Concern and High Priority Chemicals and their practical quantification limits. NYSDEC will also re-present select topics from the May 26, 2021, public meeting, as some details have changed in response to feedback received. NYSDEC states that there will be time for stakeholders to discuss the information presented. Those who wish to attend the virtual public meeting must register. NYSDEC will record the meeting and post the recording afterward.
 
New York’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL) Article 37 Title 9 establishes an ingredient disclosure program and prohibits certain chemicals in children’s products. ECL Article 37 instructs NYSDEC to promulgate lists of chemicals of concern and high priority chemicals that must be disclosed if present in children's products by March 1, 2022. ECL Article 37 also prohibits the sale of children’s products containing benzene, asbestos, or tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate effective January 1, 2023.
 
NYSDEC is in the process of developing a rule to implement portions of the law. According to NYSDEC, the rule is expected to address the specific product categories that are covered, what chemicals and supporting information must be disclosed, details on how to obtain a waiver from reporting or the sales prohibition, and the fees associated with reporting and applying for a waiver.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on August 31, 2021, the availability of the latest Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Inventory. EPA states that the biannual update to the public TSCA Inventory is part of its regular posting of non-confidential TSCA Inventory data. EPA plans the next regular update of the Inventory for winter 2022. According to EPA, the Inventory contains 86,607 chemicals of which 41,953 are active in U.S commerce. Other updates to the TSCA Inventory include new chemical substance additions, commercial activity data and regulatory flags, such as polymer exemptions, TSCA Section 4 test orders, and TSCA Section 5 significant new use rules (SNUR). In April 2021, EPA released a list of 390 chemicals expected to lose their confidential status and move to the public portion of the Inventory. EPA states that it continues to work on final declassifications for these chemicals and plans to include them in the next public posting of the TSCA Inventory.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
On August 23, 2021, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of and solicited public comment on guidance on two petition processes applicable to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) regulations. 86 Fed. Reg. 47102. The guidance covers petitions for full exemption of byproduct substances that are recycled or otherwise used within site-limited, physically enclosed systems and petitions for partial exemption of chemicals for which the CDR processing and use information has been determined to be of “low current interest” by EPA. EPA states that the guidance “is designed to elucidate the process and requirements of CDR-specific petitions and is consistent with both existing regulations and guidance.” The CDR regulations require manufacturers (including importers) of certain chemical substances included on the TSCA Chemical Substance Inventory (TSCA Inventory) to report data on the manufacturing, processing, and use of the chemical substances. According to EPA, the guidance identifies and clarifies examples of the types of information submitters can provide to EPA in support of petitions for full or partial exemption from CDR rule requirements. EPA expects the guidance to make the requirements and process of submitting a CDR-specific petition “more comprehensible,” enabling petitioners to determine if a petition is appropriate and to provide better a petition containing the information needed for EPA to reach a determination. Comments on the guidance are due December 21, 2021.


 
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