Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is a Washington, D.C. law firm providing chemical and chemical product stakeholders unparalleled experience, judgment, and excellence in matters relating to TSCA, and other global chemical management programs.

Wednesday, June 30, 2021
9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (EDT)
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Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®), the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), and the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health are pleased to present “TSCA Reform - Five Years Later.” This complimentary virtual conference marks the fifth Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Annual Conference, reflecting on the accomplishments and challenges since the implementation of the 2016 Lautenberg Amendments and where TSCA stands today. Speakers will dive into a host of topics, including the systems of risk evaluation and risk management, environmental justice, regulating per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), new chemicals, and more. Register online.

Full Agenda:

9:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

 

Welcome and Overview of Virtual Forum
Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., Michael and Lori Milken Dean, Milken Institute School of Public Health, Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health, George Washington University
9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Morning Keynote Discussion
Michal Freedhoff, Assistant Administrator, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panel 1: Risk Evaluation under TSCA
With the EPA under the Trump Administration completing 10 evaluations and the EPA conducting another 23 under the Biden Administration, there are differences of opinion over what the law requires and the best way to assess chemical risks. This panel will share perspectives on these issues and discuss whether and how the new Administration might revisit the 10 completed evaluations.
Panelists:
Robert M. Sussman, Principal, Sussman & Associates, Moderator
Ryan J. Carra, Ph.D., Principal, Beveridge & Diamond, P.C.
Penny Fenner-Crisp, Ph.D., Environmental Protection Network
Suzanne Hartigan, Ph.D., Senior Director, Regulatory and Technical Affairs, American Chemistry Council
Jon Kalmuss-Katz, Supervising Senior Attorney, Earthjustice

11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panel 2: Risk Management under TSCA
The new regulatory frontier associated with the 2016 TSCA amendments is determining how best to manage chemical risks found to be unreasonable. This panel will discuss EPA’s authority under the Lautenberg amendments and options for deploying its risk management authority.
Panelists:
Jeffery T. Morris, Ph.D., Jeff Morris Solutions, LLC, Moderator
Eve C. Gartner, Managing Attorney, Toxic Exposure & Health Program, Earthjustice
Randy S. Rabinowitz, Executive Director, OSH Law Project LLC
Sara Beth Watson, Of Counsel, Steptoe & Johnson LLP
Kimberly Wise White, Ph.D., Vice President, Regulatory and Technical Affairs, American Chemistry Council

11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panel 3: TSCA and Environmental Justice
The TSCA amendments offer enormous opportunities to help eliminate environmental injustice by evaluating and managing chemical risks. This panel will consider how TSCA can be leveraged to address concerns regarding environmental justice.
Panelists:
Lynn L. Bergeson, Managing Partner, Bergeson & Campbell P.C., Moderator
Dianne Barton, Council Chair, National Tribal Toxics Council
Marianne Engelman Lado, Deputy General Counsel, Environmental Initiatives, Office of General Counsel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Timothy W. Hardy, Partner, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P.
Adrienne Hollis, Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists
12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. Luncheon Keynote
Hon. Jeffrey Alan Merkley, U.S. Senator, Oregon (invited)

1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panel 4: New Chemicals Review
The TSCA New Chemicals Program was modified in the 2016 amendments and what the law requires has been vigorously debated. This panel will discuss the evolution of EPA’s implementation of Section 5 under the past Administration and now under the Biden Administration.
Panelists:
Lawrence E. Culleen, Partner, Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP, Moderator
Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Partner, Baker Botts L.L.P.
Richard A. Denison, Ph.D., Lead Senior Scientist, Environmental Defense Fund
Richard E. Engler, Ph.D., Director of Chemistry, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.
Daniel Rosenberg, Director, Federal Toxics Policy, Healthy People & Thriving Communities Program, Natural Resources Defense Council

3:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panel 5: TSCA and PFAS
This panel will address how TSCA authorities can be used to address concerns about both new and existing PFAS, as this class of substances continues to gain significant attention.
Panelists:
Robert M. Sussman, Principal, Sussman & Associates, Moderator
Dennis R. Deziel, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. and former Administrator, Region I, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Liz Hitchcock, Director, Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families
Robert J. Simon, Vice President, Chemical Products and Technology and Chlorine Chemistry, American Chemistry Council
Betsy Southerland, Issue Team, Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Environmental Protection Network

3:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

 

 

 

 

Panel 6: TSCA Litigation Update
Unsurprisingly, TSCA litigation is on the rise five years into implementation of the new law. This panel will discuss key issues in dispute and where the courts might be headed.
Panelists:
Lynn L. Bergeson, Managing Partner, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C., Moderator
Martha E. Marrapese, Partner, Wiley Rein LLP
Gavin McCabe, Special Assistant Attorney General, New York State Office of Attorney General

4:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

 

Concluding Remarks and Adjournment
Scott Fulton, President, Environmental Law Institute
John Pendergrass, Vice President, Programs & Publications, Environmental Law Institute

 
Join ELI, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C., the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, leading experts, and distinguished keynote speakers for a robust exploration of the issues and regulations surrounding TSCA. Full program and registration available online.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson
 
On June 10, 2021, the Retail Industry Leaders Association’s (RILA) Retail Compliance Center (RCC) and Lynn L. Bergeson, Managing Partner, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®), presented “TSCA - It Is Not What You May Think.” While the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) has long been regarded as a law applying to chemical producers, reforms made in 2016 have drawn many retailers, product manufacturers, and other “article” manufacturers into TSCA’s reach. Nothing illustrates this more clearly than a recent final rule under Section 6(h) limiting or prohibiting the manufacture (including import), processing, and/or distribution in commerce of five persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals, including phenol, isopropylated phosphate (3:1) (PIP (3:1)). This complimentary webinar, intended for large and small retailers, product stewards, and professionals throughout the product supply chain, covered:

  • What TSCA is and why it matters to retailers;
  • What retailers need to know about their products;
  • What the PIP (3:1) case study signals about the potential reach of TSCA; and
  • What steps to take to prepare for new regulations.

A full recording of this webinar is available now, along with slides and detailed responses to the Q&A portion of the event.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
As reported in our January 6, 2021, blog item, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued final rules under Section 6(h) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for five persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals, including phenol, isopropylated phosphate (3:1) (PIP (3:1)) (86 Fed. Reg. 894). The final rules limit or prohibit the manufacture (including import), processing, and/or distribution in commerce of the five PBTs, with certain exceptions. In accordance with Biden-Harris Administration Executive Orders and directives, as well as “[‌n]ewly-raised compliance issues” associated with the PIP (3:1) rule, EPA announced on March 8, 2021, that it would ask for additional public comment. EPA also issued a temporary 180-day “No Action Assurance” (NAA) indicating that the Agency will exercise its enforcement discretion regarding the prohibitions on processing and distribution of PIP (3:1) for use in articles, and the articles to which PIP (3:1) has been added.
 
Under the final rule, each person who manufactures PIP (3:1) for any use after March 8, 2021, must, prior to or concurrent with the shipment, notify persons to whom PIP (3:1) is shipped, in writing, of the prohibitions on processing, distribution, and releases to water. 40 C.F.R. § 751.407(e)(1). Each person who processes or distributes in commerce PIP (3:1) or PIP (3:1)-containing products for any use after July 6, 2021, must, prior to or concurrent with the shipment, notify persons to whom PIP (3:1) is shipped, in writing, of the prohibitions on processing, distribution, and releases to water. 40 C.F.R. § 751.407(e)(2). The final rule clarifies that the downstream notification requirement applies only to those scenarios where a product has an accompanying safety data sheet (SDS). EPA also included an alternative method of compliance for downstream notification. If a manufacturer, processor, or distributor chooses, they may include specified text on their label, instead of on their SDS.
 
EPA’s NAA applies only to the prohibitions on processing and distribution of PIP (3:1) for use in articles, and the articles to which PIP (3:1) has been added. It does not apply to the downstream notification requirements or to the downstream notification requirements for manufacturers that began March 9, 2021. Processors and distributors should review the regulations now to ensure that they are prepared to begin providing downstream notifications on July 7, 2021. Information regarding Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.’s TSCA services is available on our website.


 

By Christopher R. Blunck, Carla N. Hutton, and Lynn L. Bergeson
 
On June 11, 2021, the Office and Management and Budget released its “Spring 2021 Unified Agenda of Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions” (Regulatory Agenda). It includes an entry for an interim final rule planned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entitled “Regulation of Persistent, Bioaccumulative, and Toxic Chemicals Under TSCA Section 6(h); Reconsideration and Extension of Certain Compliance Dates.” This action, planned for publication in September 2021, would be in follow-up to EPA’s March 16, 2021, proposed rule that sought additional public comment on final rules published on January 6, 2021, covering five persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals, i.e., decabromodiphenyl ether; 2,4,6-tris(tert-butyl)phenol; hexachlorobutadiene, pentachlorothiophenol; and phenol, isopropylated phosphate (3:1) (PIP (3:1)).
 
In the March 16, 2021, proposed rule, EPA stated that it sought additional public comment in “accordance with the January 21, 2021, Executive Order entitled “Protecting Public Health and the Environment and Restoring Science to Tackle the Climate Crisis” and other Biden-Harris Administration Executive orders and other direction.” EPA stated also in the proposed rule that it is “aware of and plans to consider revisions in response to implementation issues that have been raised by a range of stakeholders” and that “[‌i]n particular, EPA is seeking comment on newly-raised issues associated with the March 8, 2021, compliance date in the PIP (3:1) rule for certain regulated articles.”
 
Concurrent with EPA’s announcement on March 8, 2021, of the March 16, 2021, proposed rule that opened the PBT rules for comment, EPA issued a temporary 180-day “No Action Assurance” (NAA) indicating that EPA would exercise its enforcement discretion regarding the prohibitions on processing and distribution of PIP (3:1) for use in articles, and the articles to which PIP (3:1) has been added. EPA stated that it “is taking this [NAA] action to ensure that the supply chain of these important articles is not interrupted while EPA continues to collect the information needed to best inform subsequent regulatory efforts and allow for the issuance of a final agency action to extend the March 8, 2021, compliance date as necessary.” EPA stated that the NAA “is to remain in effect until either (1) 11:59 PM ET, September 4, 2021, or (2) the effective date of a final action addressing the compliance date for the prohibition on processing and distributing in commerce of PIP (3:1); including in PIP (3:1)-containing articles, whichever occurs earlier.”
 
The Regulatory Agenda entry for the interim final rule states that EPA intends to address compliance date issues in the action, and that if it “determines to further amend the recent final [PBT] rules, EPA will address those amendments in one or more future Regulatory Agenda entries.”


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
As reported in our March 9, 2021, blog item, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on March 8, 2021, that “in accordance with Biden-Harris Administration executive orders and directives,” it is asking for additional public input on five final rules for persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals issued on January 6, 2021, under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).  On March 16, 2021, EPA announced that comments on the final rules are due May 17, 202186 Fed. Reg. 14398.  EPA seeks comment on:

  • Whether the rules sufficiently reduce exposure to these chemicals, including exposures to potentially exposed or susceptible subpopulations and the environment;
  • Newly raised compliance issues associated with the final rule on phenol, isopropylated phosphate (3:1) (PIP (3:1)), including the compliance dates for certain regulated articles; and
  • Whether to consider additional or alternative measures or approaches.

EPA will use the feedback received during the comment period to determine the best path forward, which could include amending the final rules to include additional or alternative exposure reduction measures or extending compliance dates for certain regulated products and articles.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on February 18, 2021, that it is opening a public comment period for a manufacturer-requested risk evaluation of octahydro-tetramethyl-naphthalenyl-ethanone (OTNE), a category of chemical substances consisting of four inseparable individual isomers.  EPA notes that two chemicals in the OTNE category are considered persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals under TSCA, “meaning they are toxic, can remain in the environment for long periods of time, and can build up or accumulate in the body.”  Upon publication of the Federal Register notice announcing the public comment period, EPA will accept public comments on the request for 45 days.  EPA states that it “welcomes all public comments,” particularly on the following:

  • Any information not included in the manufacturer request that commenters believe EPA would need to conduct a risk evaluation;
     
  • Additional conditions of use EPA is proposing to include in the risk evaluation; and
     
  • Information on conditions of use not included in the manufacturer request or in the additional conditions of use EPA proposes to include in the risk evaluation, specifically the inclusion of any additional conditions of use and potentially exposed or susceptible subpopulations.  EPA states that it “is in the process of broadly re-examining how it intends to implement these and other provisions of amended TSCA including determining how new executive orders will be addressed.  This process would benefit greatly from stakeholder feedback.”

After the comment period closes, EPA will review the comments and either grant or deny the request to conduct a risk evaluation within 60 days.  If EPA grants the request, the manufacturers would be responsible for half the cost of the risk evaluation.  International Flavors and Fragrances, Inc., Privi Organics USA Corporation, and DRT America, Inc. formally requested the risk evaluation through the OTNE Consortium managed by B&C® Consortia Management, L.L.C. (BCCM).


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton

On February 5, 2021, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it is reviewing actions issued under the previous Administration and will take any needed steps to ensure that they protect human health and the environment.  The announcement included an update on the following chemical safety actions that have immediate or near-term effective dates or other steps associated with them.  According to the announcement, these actions, along with other chemical safety actions identified by the Biden-Harris Administration, “will undergo review (and, as necessary, revisions) to ensure they are protective of human health and the environment.”

PBT Final Rules

Under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), EPA was required to take expedited action on certain persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals and promulgate final risk management actions no later than the statutory deadline of December 2020.  As reported in our December 23, 2020, memorandum, EPA released on December 22, 2020, final rules under TSCA Section 6(h) for five PBT chemicals -- 2,4,6-tris(tert-butyl)phenol (2,4,6-TTBP) (86 Fed. Reg. 866); decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) (86 Fed. Reg. 880); hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) (86 Fed. Reg. 922); pentachlorothiophenol (PCTP) (86 Fed. Reg. 911); and phenol, isopropylated phosphate (3:1) (PIP (3:1)) (86 Fed. Reg. 894).  The final rules took effect February 5, 2021.  EPA states that it “is aware of concerns about these rules, including implementation issues, that have been raised by a range of stakeholders and may consider additional measures, approaches, or revisions that build upon the steps taken thus far.”

Dust Lead Post-Abatement Clearance Level (DLCL) Final Rule

In January 2021, EPA issued a final rule establishing lower clearance levels for the amount of lead that can remain in dust on floors and window sills after lead removal activities (abatement), strengthening lead regulations to protect children’s health.  86 Fed. Reg. 983.  The DLCL final rule goes into effect on March 8, 2021.  EPA states that it will continue to consider the DLCL final rule and the related final rule for Dust-Lead Hazard Standards, which was revised in 2019, as a part of its broader review of actions, in accordance with the Executive Orders and other direction provided by the Biden-Harris Administration.

TSCA Risk Evaluations and Risk Management for First Ten Chemicals

EPA issued final TSCA risk evaluations for the first ten chemicals starting in June 2020 and immediately began the risk management process for each of these chemicals.  According to EPA, while outreach and stakeholder engagement on risk management activities for these chemicals will continue to move forward, EPA “is actively reviewing the final risk evaluations in light of statutory obligations and policy objectives related to use of the best available science and protection of human health and the environment, in accordance with the Executive Orders and other direction provided by the Biden-Harris Administration.”  More information on the final risk evaluations is available in our memoranda available at https://www.lawbc.com/regulatory-developments/tsca.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on December 8, 2020, that it received a complete manufacturer request to conduct a risk evaluation of octahydro-tetramethyl-naphthalenyl-ethanone (OTNE), a category of chemical substances consisting of four inseparable individual isomers.  International Flavors and Fragrances, Inc., Privi Organics USA Corporation, and DRT America, Inc. formally requested the risk evaluation through the OTNE Consortium managed by B&C® Consortia Management, L.L.C. (BCCM).  According to EPA, OTNE is used as a fragrance ingredient, and the four chemicals were identified in the 2014 Update to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Work Plan.
 
EPA states that it “worked diligently with the manufacturers to ensure this request was high-quality, complete, and met all the necessary legal requirements.”  Two chemicals in the category are considered persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals under TSCA, and EPA describes this request for a manufacturer-requested risk evaluation as “part of EPA’s overall efforts to address PBTs.”
 
Within 15 business days of receiving a facially complete request, EPA must notify the public of receipt of the request under 40 C.F.R. Section 702.37(e)(2).  Within 60 business days of receipt of a facially complete request, EPA will submit for publication the receipt of the request in the Federal Register, open a public docket for the request, and provide no less than 45 calendar days for public comment.  The docket will contain the manufacturer request, EPA’s proposed additions of conditions of use, and the basis for those proposed additions.  During the public comment period, the public may comment on the request, as well as the additional conditions of use EPA proposes for inclusion.  After the comment period closes, EPA has up to 60 days to either grant or deny the request to conduct a risk evaluation under 40 C.F.R. Section 702.37(e)(6).


 

Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is pleased to announce the release of the complete suite of TSCA Tutor™ regulatory training courses online and on-demand at www.TSCAtutor.com.  Professionals seeking expert, efficient, essential training can preview and enroll in on-demand classes to complete at their own pace and timing.  In addition to the newly released online e-learning courses, B&C’s TSCA Tutor™ training platform offers live in-person training at a company’s site and customized live webinar training, so companies can mix and match training modules and training approaches to provide the most suitable combination for their work needs.
 
Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) awareness is a critically important element in the 21st century work environment for any business that involves industrial chemicals.  The new normal requires awareness of TSCA’s application to a company’s operations to ensure consistent compliance with TSCA regulations and, importantly, to understand and anticipate how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ongoing implementation of new TSCA will impact a company’s industrial chemical selection and use processes.
 
TSCA Tutor™ online training courses include:

  • Video lessons.
  • Detailed hand-out materials, including copies of all presentations and relevant course materials from EPA and other sources.
  • Customizable, yet detailed and ready-to-use Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for the regulatory topic covered in the session.
 
The courses were developed and are presented by members of B&C’s renowned TSCA practice group, which includes five former senior EPA officials; an extensive scientific staff, including seven Ph.D.s; and a robust and highly experienced team of lawyers and non-lawyer professionals extremely well versed in all aspects of TSCA law, regulation, policy, compliance, and litigation.
 
Online courses are offered at $100 for one-hour modules and $200 for 2-hour modules, or $1,400 for the full 12-module training.  Courses can be completed at the learner’s own pace, and enrollment is valid for one full year.  Interested professionals should visit www.TSCAtutor.com to view sample course segments and purchase modules.  Volume discounts are available for companies wishing to purchase courses for multiple employees.  Companies interested in live in-person or customized live webinar training should contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to schedule.
 
For more information about TSCA Tutor™, contact Heidi Lewis at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or read our full course descriptions here.
 
TSCA Tutor -- Curriculum


ONE-HOUR SESSIONS:

  • An Overview of TSCA (Course number T101)
  • New TSCA at a Glance (Course number T102)
  • Import Requirements, TSCA Section 13 (Course number T103)
  • Export Requirements, TSCA Section 12 (Course number T104)
  • Confidential Business Information (CBI) (Course number T105)
  • Reporting and Retention of Information, TSCA Section 8 (Course number T106)

TWO-HOUR SESSIONS:

  • Inspections and Audits (Course number T201)
    • Preparing for a TSCA Audit
    • TSCA Penalties/Overview of Self-Confession Policy
  • TSCA Section 5, Part 1:  TSCA Chemical Inventory, Exemptions (Course number T202)
    • TSCA Inventory
    • Exemptions
  • TSCA Section 5, Part 2:  New Chemicals/New Use (Course number T203)
    • New Chemicals/New Use
    • SNURs
  • Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) (Course number T204)
    • CDR Overview
    • Byproduct Reporting under CDR
  • Chemical Testing (Regulatory)/Animal Welfare, TSCA Section 4 (Course number T205):
    • Chemical Testing
    • How to Prepare/Engage If a Chemical of Interest Is Listed under TSCA Section 4
  • Prioritization and Risk Evaluation, TSCA Section 6 (Course number T206)
    • Overview of Section 6 Risk Framework -- Prioritization, Evaluation, and Management
    • How to Prepare/Engage If a Chemical of Interest Is Listed under Section 6

Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. is a Washington, D.C., law firm focusing on conventional, biobased, and nanoscale industrial, agricultural, and specialty chemical product approval and regulation, and associated business issues.  B&C represents clients in many businesses, including basic, specialty, and agricultural and antimicrobial chemicals; biotechnology, nanotechnology, and emerging transformative technologies; paints and coatings; plastic products; and chemical manufacturing, formulation, distribution, and consumer product sectors.  Visit www.lawbc.com for more information.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on September 20, 2019, that it will extend the public comment period for its proposed rule intended to reduce exposures to certain chemicals that are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT).  84 Fed. Reg. 36728.  EPA identified five chemicals pursuant to Section 6(h) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA):  decabromodiphenyl ether (DecaBDE); phenol, isopropylated phosphate (3:1) (PIP (3:1)), also known as tris(4-isopropylphenyl) phosphate; 2,4,6-tris(tert-butyl)phenol (2,4,6-TTBP); hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD); and pentachlorothiophenol (PCTP).  The proposed rule would restrict or prohibit manufacture (including import), processing, and distribution in commerce for many uses of all of the chemicals except HCBD, for which EPA is proposing no regulatory action.  For the other four chemicals, the proposed rule includes recordkeeping requirements, as well as additional downstream notification requirements for PIP (3:1).  Comments are now due October 28, 2019.  EPA is required to issue a final rule by December 2020.  Our June 24, 2019, memorandum, “EPA Publishes Proposed PBT Chemicals Rule under TSCA,” provides a detailed review and analysis.

Tags: PBT, Section 6,

 
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