Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is a Washington, D.C. law firm providing chemical and chemical product stakeholders unparalleled experience, judgment, and excellence in matters relating to TSCA, and other global chemical management programs.

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced on January 19, 2023, that it received a petition requesting the addition of 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin copolymer (bisphenol A epoxy resin) to the list of taxable substances under Section 4672(a) of the Internal Revenue Code. 88 Fed. Reg. 3478. The petitioner is Westlake Epoxy Inc., an exporter of 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin copolymer. According to the petition, “4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-Epichlorohydrin Copolymer is a Bisphenol A Epoxy Resin and is used for Epoxide Resin. 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-Epichlorohydrin Copolymer is derived from the taxable chemicals benzene, propylene, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide and produced predominantly from epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A via a two-step glycidation reaction sequence. Taxable chemicals comprise 92.98 percent of the final product.” Comments and requests for a public hearing are due March 20, 2023. More information on the Superfund excise tax on chemicals is available in our July 13, 2022, memorandum, “Superfund Tax on Chemicals: What You Need to Know to Comply,” and our May 19, 2022, memorandum, “Reinstated Superfund Excise Tax Imposed on Certain Chemical Substances.”


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced on December 30, 2022, that it received a petition requesting the addition of polyphenylene sulfide to the list of taxable substances under Section 4672(a) of the Internal Revenue Code. 87 Fed. Reg. 80579. The petitioner is Celanese Ltd., an exporter of polyphenylene sulfide. According to the petition, “polyphenylene sulfide is a high-performance thermoplastic, has high heat and chemical resistance, and is used in applications such as filters, appliance, machine and automobile parts, replacing steel in some cases.” Polyphenylene sulfide is manufactured by the polymerization of 1,4-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB), a taxable substance, with sodium hydrosulfide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium hydrosulfide is made from sodium hydroxide and hydrogen sulfide. Taxable chemicals constitute 90.0 percent by weight of the materials used to produce this substance. Comments and requests for a public hearing are due February 28, 2023. More information on the Superfund excise tax on chemicals is available in our July 13, 2022, memorandum, “Superfund Tax on Chemicals: What You Need to Know to Comply” and our May 19, 2022, memorandum, “Reinstated Superfund Excise Tax Imposed on Certain Chemical Substances.”


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton
 
As reported in our May 19, 2022, memorandum, the Superfund excise tax on certain chemical substances was reinstated beginning on July 1, 2022, under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced on June 24, 2022, that it has posted frequently asked questions (FAQ) on the Superfund chemical excise tax. The IRS released Revenue Procedure 2022-26, which provides the exclusive procedures for requesting a determination under Section 4672(a)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) that a substance be added to or removed from the list of taxable substances under Section 4672(a) of the Code (List). The sale or use of any such taxable substances by importers of such substances is subject to the excise tax imposed by Section 4671(a) of the Code, subject to certain exceptions. Section 4 of the revenue procedure states that an importer or exporter of any substance, or a person other than an importer or exporter of such substance (interested person), may request to add such substance to the List or remove such substance from the List by submitting a petition to the IRS. According to the revenue procedure, any requests to modify the List that were submitted prior to publication of this revenue procedure or in response to the request for comments in Notice 2021-66 do not meet the requirements of this revenue procedure. The IRS will not process such requests. A petition may be submitted to add a substance to the List if taxable chemicals constitute more than 20 percent of the weight or value of the materials used to produce such substance. A petition may be submitted to remove a substance from the List if taxable chemicals constitute 20 percent or less of the weight and 20 percent or less of the value of the materials used to produce such substance. Separate petitions must be submitted for each substance to be added to or removed from the List. The IRS will publish a Notice of Filing in the Federal Register, beginning a 60-day comment period on the petition. In the case of a petition submitted by an importer or exporter of a substance, the IRS will make a determination within 180 days after the date the petition is filed. The 180-day determination period may be extended by agreement between the petitioner and the IRS. The 180-day determination period does not apply to petitions submitted by interested persons (a person other than an importer or exporter of such substance).

Tags: Superfund, Tax

 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Carla N. Hutton

The Internal Revenue Service announced on June 24, 2022, that it has posted frequently asked questions (FAQ) on the Superfund chemical excise tax. The FAQs detail what the Superfund chemical excise tax is, how the tax is computed, and who may be liable for the tax. The Superfund chemical taxes will be reported on Form 720, Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return, and Form 6627, Environmental Taxes. The excise taxes were reinstated beginning on July 1, 2022, under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. The IRS notes that there are two separate Superfund chemical excise taxes: a tax on the sale or use of “taxable chemicals” and a tax on the sale or use of imported “taxable substances.” Specifically, the reinstated taxes impose an excise tax on the sale or use of a taxable chemical by the manufacturer, producer, or importer of the taxable chemical. They also impose an excise tax on the sale or use of a taxable substance by the importer of the taxable substance. The IRS states that the FAQs provide general information. According to the IRS, at the time of publication of these FAQs, 151 substances are listed as taxable substances. The IRS states “[t]hat number will likely change as substances are added to or removed from the list of taxable substances.” The FAQs added June 24, 2022, include:

Q1.      What are the Superfund chemical excise taxes?

Q2.      When do the Superfund chemical excise taxes go into effect?

Q3.      What is a taxable chemical?

Q4.      What is a taxable substance?

Q5.      How are substances added to or removed from the list of taxable substances?

Q6.      How do I calculate the section 4661 tax?

Q7.      I am an importer of taxable substances. How do I calculate the section 4671 tax?

Q8.      What happens if an importer does not calculate the section 4671 tax?

Q9.      Will the IRS prescribe tax rates for taxable substances?

Q10.    Who is responsible for reporting and paying Superfund chemical excise taxes?

Q11.    How are the Superfund chemical excise taxes reported?

Q12.    When is the first return due?

Q13.    Are semimonthly deposits required?

Q14.    Under what circumstances is registration required?

Q15.    Is there a way to check the status of an application for Activity Letter G registration?

More information on the Superfund excise tax on certain chemical substances is available in our May 19, 2022, memorandum.

Tags: IRS, Superfund, tax